Difference between Ind AS 20 on Accounting for Government Grants and Disclosure of Government Assistance and AS 12 on Accounting for Government Grants

(i) Ind AS 20 deals with the other forms of government assistance which do not fall within the definition of government grants. It requires that an indication of other forms of government assistance from which the entity has directly benefited should be disclosed in the financial statements. However, AS 12 does not deal with such government assistance.

(ii) AS 12 requires that in case the grant is in respect of non depreciable assets, the amount of the grant should be shown as capital reserve which is a part of shareholders’ funds. It further requires that if a grant related to a non-depreciable asset requires the fulfillment of certain obligations, the grant should be credited to income over the same period over which the cost of meeting such obligations is charged to income. AS 12 also gives an alternative to treat such grants as a deduction from the cost of such asset.

As compared to the above, Ind AS 20, is based on the principle that all government grants would normally have certain obligations attached to them and these grants should be recognised as income over the periods which bear the cost of meeting the obligation. It, therefore, specifically prohibits recognition of grants directly in the shareholders’ funds.

(iii) AS 12 recognises that some government grants have the characteristics similar to those of promoters’ contribution. It requires that such grants should be credited directly to capital reserve and treated as a part of shareholders’ funds. Ind AS 20 does not recognise government grants of the nature of promoters’ contribution. As stated at (ii) above, Ind AS 20 is based on the principle that all government grants would normally have certain obligations attached to them and it, accordingly, requires all grants to be recognised as income over the periods which bear the cost of meeting the obligation.

(iv) AS 12 requires that government grants in the form of nonmonetary assets, given at a concessional rate, should be accounted for on the basis of their acquisition cost. In case a non-monetary asset is given free of cost, it should be recorded at a nominal value. Ind AS 20 requires to value non-monetary grants at their fair value, since it results into presentation of more relevant information and is conceptually superior as compared to valuation at a nominal amount.

(v) Existing AS 12 gives an option to present the grants related to assets, including non-monetary grants at fair value in the balance sheet either by setting up the grant as deferred income or by deducting the grant from the gross value of asset concerned in arriving at at its book value. Ind AS 20 requires presentation of such grants in balance sheet only by setting up the grant as deferred income. Thus, the option to present such grants by deduction of the grant in arriving at at at its book value is not available under Ind AS 20

(vi) Ind AS 20 includes Appendix A which deals with Government Assistance—No Specific Relation to Operating Activities

(vii) Ind AS 20 requires that loans received from a government that have a below-market rate of interest should be recognised and measured in accordance with Ind AS 39 (which requires all loans to be recognised at fair value, thus requiring interest to be imputed to loans with a below-market rate of interest) whereas AS 12 does not require so. (ICAI)